Polio

On May 19, 2017 By

Polio By Catherine A. Paul

What Is Polio?

The first U.S. polio epidemic swept across the country in 1916, and then again in the late 1940s and 1950s. Polio is caused by a virus; it affects the body by attacking the central nervous system, specifically those neurons essential for muscle activity. Polio begins similar […]

Continue Reading

Written by Catherine A. Paul. “Throughout the history of the United States, music has been used to bring people together. By singing together, people are able to form emotional bonds and even shape behavior…Therefore, it is unsurprising that social movements have similarly interwoven music and action to create and sustain commitment to causes and collective activities.”

Continue Reading

The March (1963) Film

On February 16, 2017 By

The March (1963) Film Directed by James Blue. Introduction by Carl Rowan. Courtesy of the National Archives (National Archives Identifier 47526)

 

Note: The audio from 23:13 to 29:44 in this film has been redacted due to a copyright restriction by Dr. King’s family.

In 2008, The Motion Picture Preservation Lab completed a full digital […]

Continue Reading

The Dutch government surrendered to the Nazis 5 days after the Germans invaded in May, 1940. Millions of Jews, Gypsies, and others were slaughtered, while some Dutch people risked their lives to help the victims….Marion Pritchard was one of the rescuers. She concealed a Jewish family for nearly 3 years and killed a Dutch Nazi policeman to save the children.

Continue Reading

James Augustine Healy: The First African American To Be Ordained a Roman Catholic Priest

Continue Reading

Brown, William Wells (1814-1884)

On November 25, 2016 By

William Wells Brown –  Anti-Slavery Lecturer, Groundbreaking Novelist, Playwright and Historian

 

 

Introduction: William Wells Brown was an African American anti-slavery lecturer, groundbreaking novelist, playwright and historian. He is widely considered to have been the first African American to publish works in several major literary genres. Known for his continuous political activism especially in his involvement with the anti-slavery […]

Continue Reading

“Teapot Dome” Scandal: 1922

On November 12, 2016 By

“The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding…Before the Watergate scandal, Teapot Dome was regarded as the ‘greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics.'”

Continue Reading

Woodrow Wilson, a leader of the Progressive Movement, was the 28th President of the United States (1913-1921). After a policy of neutrality at the outbreak of World War I, Wilson led America into war in order to “make the world safe for democracy.”….Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. “No one but the President,” he said, “seems to be expected … to look out for the general interests of the country.” He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world “safe for democracy.”

Continue Reading

Behind the facade, not all of Harding’s Administration was so impressive. Word began to reach the President that some of his friends were using their official positions for their own enrichment. Alarmed, he complained, “My…friends…they’re the ones that keep me walking the floors nights!”….Looking wan and depressed, Harding journeyed westward in the summer of 1923, taking with him his upright Secretary of Commerce, Herbert Hoover. “If you knew of a great scandal in our administration,” he asked Hoover, “would you for the good of the country and the party expose it publicly or would you bury it?” Hoover urged publishing it, but Harding feared the political repercussions.

Continue Reading

Coolidge was “distinguished for character more than for heroic achievement,” wrote a Democratic admirer, Alfred E. Smith. “His great task was to restore the dignity and prestige of the Presidency when it had reached the lowest ebb in our history … in a time of extravagance and waste….”

Continue Reading