Written by Catherine A. Paul. “Throughout the history of the United States, music has been used to bring people together. By singing together, people are able to form emotional bonds and even shape behavior…Therefore, it is unsurprising that social movements have similarly interwoven music and action to create and sustain commitment to causes and collective activities.”

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Goldberg, Arthur Joseph

On January 22, 2016 By

Arthur J. Goldberg (1908-1990) – Legal Strategist and Adviser to the American Labor Movement

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Reuther, Walter (1907 – 1970)

On January 11, 2016 By

Walter Reuther, Labor Organizer and President of the United Automobile Workers from 1946 to 1970

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Gompers, Samuel (1850-1924)

On November 20, 2015 By

Samuel Gompers, 1850-1924: The Grand Old Man of Labor

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Paper written by Judson MacLaury, U.S. Department of Labor Historian, and delivered at the Annual Meeting for the Society for History in the Federal Government. It reflects another step in the evolution of the civil rights movement and a graphic description of some of the political and governmental obstacles the African-American community faced in becoming an integral part of American society.

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By Jonathan Grossman. “At the dawn of the 20th century, when 8.5 million blacks constituted about 12 percent of the population of the United States…not a single first‑grade college in America undertook to give any considerable scientific attention to the American Negro.”

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Women’s Bureau

On November 7, 2015 By

The Women’s Bureau was established in the Department of Labor by Public Law No. 259 of June 5, 1920. It is the only federal agency mandated to represent the needs of wage-earning women in the public policy process.

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Cruikshank, Nelson Hale

On November 7, 2015 By

Nelson Hale Cruikshank (1902-1986): Minister, Labor Leader and a Leader for Social Security and Medicare

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“A Brief History, “written by Judson MacLaury

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Written by Jonathan Grossman. The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 applied to industries whose combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force. In these industries, it banned oppressive child labor and set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and the maximum workweek at 44 hours.

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