Skip to main content

Passaic Textile Strike (1926) – film

The Passaic Textile Strike (1926) by Alice W. Campbell, VCU Libraries   The Passaic Textile Strike is a 1926 American silent film directed by Samuel Russak, and produced by Alfred Wagenknecht. The film’s photographers were Lester Balog, Sam Brody, and William Schwartfeller; the title cards were written by Margaret Larkin. Most of the acting was done…

Continue Reading »

Passaic Textile Strike, 1926

Passaic Textile Strike, 1926 By Catherine A. Paul The 1926 Passaic Textile Strike began on January 25th, 1926 and lasted through March 1st, 1927. The work stoppage involved more than 15,000 wool and silk workers in and around Passaic, New Jersey who mobilized in response to a 10 per cent cut in their already meager…

Continue Reading »

Children Who Labor – film (1912)

Children Who Labor (1912)   Children Who Labor was a collaboration between the Edison Company and the National Child Labor Committee, the nonprofit organization founded in 1904 and chartered by Congress to promote the rights of “children and youth as they relate to work and working.” In this melodrama, the daughter of a well-to-do industrialist is…

Continue Reading »

Paterson Silk Strike, 1913

Paterson Silk Strike, 1913 By Catherine A. Paul The Paterson Silk Strike of Paterson, New Jersey lasted from February 1913 until July 1913 and was one of many industrial conflicts that erupted between 1909 and 1913 (Golin, 1992). During the strike, 1,850 strikers were arrested and jailed, 300 mills and dye houses were shut down,…

Continue Reading »

National Social Welfare Assembly Comics Project

The National Social Welfare Assembly’s Comics Project was a collaboration between The National Social Welfare Assembly and National Comics, the company which became DC Comics. The project lasted from August, 1949 to July, 1967 and produced over 200 comic pages promoting citizenship and social values.

Continue Reading »

Music & Social Reform

Written by Catherine A. Paul. “Throughout the history of the United States, music has been used to bring people together. By singing together, people are able to form emotional bonds and even shape behavior…Therefore, it is unsurprising that social movements have similarly interwoven music and action to create and sustain commitment to causes and collective activities.”

Continue Reading »

Third Street Music School Settlement

Founded in 1894, Third Street has helped to establish community arts education in the United States. The School traces its roots to the late 19th century settlement house movement. It was the unique inspiration of Third Street founder Emilie Wagner to make high quality music instruction the centerpiece of a community settlement house that would also provide social services to the immigrant population of the Lower East Side.

Continue Reading »

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

SCLC is a now a nation wide organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries.

Continue Reading »

Nurses and Wartime St. Vincent’s Hospital

St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village was not just a place of employment for nurses, but it was also a place for education. In 1892, forty-three years after the hospital’s opening, the St. Vincent’s School of Nursing opened its doors to women. The school was first directed by Katherine A. Sanborn. Many graduates from this school continued their work at St. Vincent’s hospital. Other graduates went to work elsewhere in New York City, including the New York Foundling Hospital, another institution directed by the Sisters of Charity. Eventually, in the 1930s, St. Vincent’s School of Nursing began to accept men. This produced even more graduates and more St. Vincent’s educated nurses working in the field.

Continue Reading »