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Search Results for: war on poverty

Loeb, Sophie Irene

Sophie Irene Loeb (July 4, 1876–1929):  Child Welfare Advocate, Social Welfare Reformer, Journalist and Author.   During the Progressive Era, Sophie Loeb was one of many women to enter the political arena through reform work, calling for government involvement to mitigate the problems of poverty. Loeb brought her life experience and her personalized approach to…

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Konopka, Gisela

Gisela Konopka (1910 – 2003) — Social Group Worker, Researcher, Educator and Author by Rhoda G. Lewin Gisela Konopka’s outstanding career in youth and adolescent services, social work, education and history is reflected in her litany: “All my life I have been fighting for justice, and for respect for all people. I abhor any arrogance…

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Hopkins, Harry Lloyd

Written by Dr. June Hopkins, Associate Professor, History Dept., Armstrong Atlantic State University. Harry L. Hopkins (1890-1946) — Social Worker, Architect of the New Deal, Public Administrator and Confidant of
President Franklin D. Roosevelt

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Hoey, Jane M.

Jane M. Hoey (1892-1968) — Social Worker, Welfare Administrator, Government Official   Introduction: Jane Hoey was a social worker, a welfare administrator and a government official. Her most significant contribution was as the Director of the Bureau of Public Assistance and later the Bureau of Family Services within the U.S. Social Security Administration. She was…

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Halbert, Leroy Allen

By John E. Hansan, Ph.D. Leroy Allen Halbert (1875-1958) — Pioneer Social Worker, Director of the Nation’s First Department of Public Welfare, Advocate for the Unemployed, Social Reformer, and Author

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Ginsberg, Sadie Dashew

Sadie Dashew Ginsberg (1901–1993):  Child Welfare Advocate, Early Childhood Education Teacher and Founder of the Childrens Guild in Baltimore, MD Sadie Dashew Ginsberg was born in East Baltimore in 1901 and reared on Gay Street, the daughter of Russian immigrant parents, Jacob Dashew and Eve Chircus, who came to the city in the late 1890s…

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Dix, Dorthea Lynde

Miss Dorothea Dix (1802 – 1887): Teacher, Nurse, Social Reformer and Advocate for the Mentally Ill by Dr. Graham Warder, Keene State College Dorothea Dix was born on April 4, 1802 in the frontier town of Hampden, Maine. Her father was poor, a drifter, and probably an alcoholic. He was also a Methodist minister and…

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Day, Dorothy

Dorothy Day (November 8, 1897 – November 29, 1980) —  Journalist, Social Activist, Pacifist By Harris Chaiklin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland School of Social Work   Dorothy Day’s early life gave little indication of what lay ahead. She was bright, bookish, worked hard, and aspired to be a writer. Religion did not play…

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University Settlement of New York City

During the year 1886, in the heart of the Lower East Side, upwards of 3,000 people lived in a single square block. The tenement buildings of the area normally had four apartments on each floor; a typical apartment would consist of one small room that was well-lighted and ventilated, and several others that were wholly dark, and might house a family of five or more, and perhaps a boarder.

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Children’s Bureau

Written by Kriste Lindenmeyer, Ph.D., Professor of History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The establishment of the U.S. Children’s Bureau in 1912 marked a high point in the effort by many Americans to improve the lives of children.

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